Welcome to the SA School Canteen Network

Drinks

 

Under the Right Bite guidelines, all drinks other than plain water, juice and milk are banned in schools and pre-schools from 2008.

Water is the best drink for children and adolescents- and us adults too!  Water- tap, spring or mineral- is Green under the guidelines.

Fruit juice (Amber) must be 99% and serving size kept to 250ml or less.

Reduced or low fat milk (Green) rather than full fat (Amber) should be used where possible. Plain milk serving size is 600ml or less and flavoured milk is 375ml or less.  Coffee flavoured milk is not  to be sold in school canteens.

All carbonated drinks are classified as RED on the Right Bite Food and Drink Spectrum.  This includes water and juice that is 99%.

Remember, if it's bubbly, it's banned!

Right Bite

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The SA School Canteen Network supports the Right Bite policy and encourages all schools and preschools to follow this mandated policy.

The Right Bite strategy aims to ensure that healthy food and drink choices are available in South Australian schools and  preschools.  Specific standards banning the sale of unhealthy foods and drinks, apply to canteens and vending machines in SA schools and preschools. 



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Schools and preschools are also encouraged to use these standards to provide healthy food and drinks in all situations where food is supplied in the school and preschool environment, such as camps, excursions, fundraising, celebrations and sports days.

Schools and preschools have an important role in promoting healthy eating and physical activity to students and providing an environment that supports a healthy lifestyle.  Good nutrition is important throughout life, but particularly in the childhood years which are a time of rapid growth and development.  Schools and preschools can promote enjoyment of healthy eating and nurture a positive body image and a sense of well being.

For many students, the food and drinks consumed at preschool and school (from the canteen or brought from home) make a significant contribution to their total food intake.  The food provided also influences the development of children's long term eating habits, food preferences and attitudes towards food.  This can extend beyond the school or preschool environment and influence food choices within the family and community, enhancing the health, social and diverse cultural aspects of food and eating.